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Beware of Zealous Doctors Who Might Falsely Accuse Parents of Abuse

I have written quite a few times about Justina Pelletier the teenager who suffers from Mitochondrial Disease but who was taken off her treatment by doctors more loyal to their “behavior modification” ideology than to their oath to “Do no harm.” I mentioned her case most recently in this article.

As far as I know, Justina and her family are suing Boston Children’s hospital, and the lawsuit is still pending.

But I found this article from January from a Mitochondrial Disease News website, about parents who face false charges of “medical child abuse” by “doctors” and hospitals. The article includes references to Justina Pelletier, whose parents were falsely charged with such. The article states, “But in recent years, the U.S. mitochondrial disease community has been hit with hundreds of other false accusations of medical child abuse. MaryBeth Hollinger of MitoAction says the problem is getting worse.”

In many cases, “doctors” aren’t able to immediately find a cause for a patient’s symptoms, and already jump to the conclusion that “it’s all in her head,” i.e. the cause is psychological, to them. And many times, the doctors rush to insist that the young patient be kept in their psychiatric ward as an in-patient, to do God-knows-what, but especially to give them those goddamn psychiatric drugs. The article doesn’t say that, but that’s been my conclusion. So in my view, these damn doctors are obsessed with drugging up their patients. It’s like a religion to them, it seems to me. And also, in many cases the Children’s Hospitals or other hospitals are government-funded research hospitals, as was the case with Justina Pelletier. The doctors use the patient as a guinea pig to give these horrible drugs to and to experiment on.

The article points out, “Hollinger spoke of a general lack of awareness, noting that ‘most doctors were never taught anything about mitochondrial disease.’ Because the disease involves energy production, it varies greatly from one person to the next.”

And the article gives good advice to parents, which I back 1,000%:

Hollinger advised parents to watch what they say around doctors and nurses, and to think twice before posting photos of their children on Facebook or Twitter.

“You have to really be careful about what you share, and how it could impact your child down the line,” she said. “I would definitely say no photos. What law enforcement does is use social media to see if you are guilty or not. It is the most important aspect of their investigation. They consider social media your crime scene. Any picture that could embarrass your child at less than 18 years old is considered abusive.”

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